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SDDC Breaking News
With the capability to reduce both CapEx and OpEx, it’s easy to see why the SDN-NFV trend has taken hold in the hosting and mobile industry. Early use cases include network virtualization from cloud service providers and enterprise data centers, bandwidth calendaring and network tapping. While this early traction is promising and receiving great praise in the public eye, some of the most promising deployments are being seen in the cable multi-system-operator (MSO) industry. While these use cases aren’t garnering as much attention, they are equally interesting and have the potential to be very powerful. There are several examples that demonstrate different applications offered by MSOs modernized by SDN, such as TV Video on Demand (VoD), voice, and data, which can be delivered in both native environments and on top of these MSO applications, in different network locations.
With the rapid advancement of processor technologies, disk access has been identified as the next performance bottleneck in many cloud computing applications. In recent years, storage appliances based on flash memory technologies have been deemed as practical solutions to resolving such performance bottleneck. However, high-end flash appliances are mostly built with proprietary hardware designs, aiming at particular scenarios in larger-scale data centers, and hence are barely affordable by enterprise and industry customers that are also deploying private clouds. Innodisk FlexiRemap™ technology, on the other hand, deals with the challenges of performance, data endurance, and affordability through innovations on software and firmware, creating a new category of flash-collaborative (in contrast to flash-aware or flash-optimized) storage appliances that deliver sustained high IOPS, even for random write operations.
The old monolithic style of building enterprise applications just isn't cutting it any more. It results in applications and teams both that are complex, inefficient, and inflexible, with considerable communication overhead and long change cycles. Microservices architectures, while they've been around for a while, are now gaining serious traction with software organizations, and for good reasons: they enable small targeted teams, rapid continuous deployment, independent updates, true polyglot languages and persistence layers, and a host of other benefits. But truly adopting a microservices architecture requires dramatic changes across the entire organization, and a DevOps culture is absolutely essential.
Fundamentally, SDN is still mostly about network plumbing. While plumbing may be useful to tinker with, what you can do with your plumbing is far more intriguing. A rigid interpretation of SDN confines it to Layers 2 and 3, and that’s reasonable. But SDN opens opportunities for novel constructions in Layers 4 to 7 that solve real operational problems in data centers. “Data center,” in fact, might become anachronistic – data is everywhere, constantly on the move, seemingly always overflowing. Networks move data, but not all networks are suitable for all data. In his session at 15th Cloud Expo, Steve Riley, Technical Leader in the Office of the CTO at Riverbed Technology, will discuss how finding (or building) the right network, with the right applications, is still a labor-intensive task. Must it always be this way? No: for networks will soon be expressed as code. Finally, the data, the applications that process it, the networks that move it and the objects that store it can all be de...
The Domain Name Service (DNS) is one of the most important components in networking infrastructure, enabling users and services to access applications by translating URLs (names) into IP addresses (numbers). Because every icon and URL and all embedded content on a website requires a DNS lookup loading complex sites necessitates hundreds of DNS queries. In addition, as more internet-enabled ‘Things’ get connected, people will rely on DNS to name and find their fridges, toasters and toilets. According to a recent IDG Research Services Survey this rate of traffic will only grow. What’s driving this increase? The growth in volume is largely attributed to the rollout of new services and applications along with expanding migration to the cloud and traffic spikes. The Internet of Things will also place a strain on DNS services. Are you ready for this surge of new services and applications along with potential DNS threats?
Labor market analytics firm Wanted Analytics recently assessed the market for technology professionals and found that demand for people with proficient levels of Hadoop expertise had skyrocketed by around 33% since last year – it is true, Hadoop is hard technology to master and the labor market is not exactly flooded with an over-abundance of skilled practitioners. Hadoop has been called a foundational technology, rather than ‘just’ a database by some commentators – this almost pushes it towards being an ‘environment’ rather than it being a single software product… and this all goes towards making Hadoop even harder to master, many will agree.
Scene scenario: 10 am in a boardroom somewhere, second round of coffees served, Danish and donuts untouched, a quiet hush settles. “Well you know what guys? (and, by the use of the term guys I mean to include both sexes here assembled) – the trouble that we have as a company is that we are, to put it bluntly, just a little analytics poor,” said the newly appointed Chief Analytics Officer. That we should consider a firm to be analytically deficient or poor is a profound comment on our modern age.
The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is no time to wait for long development cycles that produce software that is obsolete at launch. DevOps may be disruptive, but it is essential. The DevOps Summit at Cloud Expo--to be held November 4-6 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in the heart of Silicon Valley--will expand the DevOps community, enable a wide sharing of knowledge, and educate delegates and technology providers alike. Recent research has shown that DevOps dramatically reduces development time, the amount of enterprise IT professionals put out fires, and support time generally. Time spent on infrastructure development is significantly increased, and DevOps practitioners report more software releases and higher quality.
Today, almost every company has a directory that needs to be managed. Spending valuable company time monitoring servers, provisioning and deprovisioning users, auditing, and assessing security concerns takes away from the core competency of the team – building product and delivering to customers quickly. DaaS takes on the burden of those tasks, and allows the team to focus on what they do best. In his session at DevOps Summit, Rajat Bahargava, Co-Founder, Chairman, and President & CEO of JumpCloud, will talk about what DaaS is, how it eases the pain caused by AD and LDAP, and why cloud-based directories are where the industry is heading.
Gridstore has announced that NAC, Inc. and Sky Tech have joined its innovative Accelerate Partner Program. Both new members cite Gridstore's expertise in enabling the Hybrid Cloud and their solution purpose-built for Hyper-V as the key criteria for their decision to join the program. Integrating seamlessly with business clients, these new partners provide industry-proven storage solutions that promote satisfied customers, profitable businesses, and communities that thrive.
The devil made him do it. Or maybe it's that the devil is in the details for Matt Olander, Chief Science Officer of iXsystems and a long-time contributor to FreeBSD. A red devil icon plays a prominent role in this NAS storage company's branding and image, which is open souce “in everything we do,” according to the company. The company now has decades of experience “producing rock-solid solutions on an open source foundation. With more than1,000 clients, we have a proven history of building and delivering the right solution every time - for open source and beyond,” the company says. We thought we'd find out what Matt has to say about open source and the state of NAS storage today: Cloud Computing Journal: What advantages does NAS storage bring as cloud computing continues to grow? Matt Olander: Network Attached Storage (NAS) allows new or existing cloud-computing platforms to easily extend storage capacity as service offerings grow. Since FreeNAS & TrueNAS offer both block & fi...
All too many discussions about DevOps conclude that the solution is an all-purpose player: developer and operations guru, complete with pager for round-the-clock duty. For most organizations that is not the way forward. In his session at DevOps Summit, Bart Copeland, President & CEO of ActiveState Software, will discuss how to achieve the agility and speed of end-to-end automation without requiring an organization stocked with Supermen and Superwomen.
The Internet of Things is tied together with a thin strand that is known as time. Coincidentally, at the core of nearly all data analytics is a timestamp. When working with time series data there are a few core principles that everyone should consider, especially across datasets where time is the common boundary. In his session at Internet of @ThingsExpo, Jim Scott, Director of Enterprise Strategy & Architecture at MapR Technologies, will discuss single-value, geo-spatial, and log time series data. By focusing on enterprise applications and the data center, he will use OpenTSDB as an example to explain some of these concepts including when to use different storage models.
for storage and computing operations at scale. These capabilities allow organizations to store massive amounts of data, in disparate formats, and perform both batch and real-time analyses upon them. The forces driving Big Data into the mainstream are the ever-decreasing cost of storage and processing, coupled with the open source enhancements of distributed systems techniques and software. Companies have realized that data storage is on the verge of being limitless, and they no longer need to be as judicious about what kinds of data they store. This realization has led to the storage of all manner of data, in addition to the traditional structured data found in relational databases.
Amazon, Google and Facebook are household names in part because of their mastery of Big Data. But what about organizations without billions of dollars to spend on Big Data tools – how can they extract value from their data? In his session at 6th Big Data Expo®, Ion Stoica, CEO and co-founder of Databricks, will discuss how the zero management cost and scalability of the cloud is addressing the challenges and pain points that data engineers face when working with Big Data. He will share how the growing demand for cloud-based Big Data workloads and frameworks is shaping the future of Big Data analysis.
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Cloud Expo New York All-Star Speakers Included...

KAIL
Netflix

GOLDEN
ActiveState

KEMP
Nebula

BEHR
Praxis Flow

LOUNIBOS
SOASTA

CRAWFORD
AVOA

MORGENTHAL
Perficient, Inc.

COCKCROFT
Battery Ventures

HAFF
Red Hat

SHALOM
GigaSpaces

SUSSNA
Ingineering.IT

ROBERTS
BMC

VERNON
VictorOps

WILLIS
Stateless Networks

ROESE
EMC

PADIR
Progress

AMAR
MyPermissions

O'CONNOR
AppZero

BHARGAVA
JumpCloud

DEVINE
IBM

RUSSELL
IBM

MALEKZADEH
Cumulus Networks

McCALLION
Bronze Drum

NEGRIS
Yottamine Analytics

JACKSON
GovCloud Network

KAVIS
Kavis Technology

HARVEY
Chef

KAR
StrongLoop

McFARLANE
LiveOps

IVANOV
Telestax

DUNKLEY
Acision

FABLING
Esri

MATTHIEU
SKYNET.im

HILLIER
CiRBA

JACOBI
Kaazing

FALLOWS
Kaazing

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Lastest Blog Posts
We (as in the industry at large) don't talk enough about applying architectural best practices with respect to emerging API and software-defined models of networking. But we should. That's because as we continue down the path that continues to software-define the network, using APIs and software development methodologies to simplify and speed the provisioning of network services, the more we run into if not rules, then best practices, that should be considered before we willy nilly start integrating all the network things.
The keys to the digital kingdom are credentials. In no industry is this more true (and ultimately more damaging) than financial services. The sophistication of the attacks used to gather those credentials and thwart the increasingly complex authentication process that guards financial transactions is sometimes staggering. That's because they require not just stealth but coordination across multiple touch points in the transaction process.
The software-defined data center (SDDC) and hyper-converged markets have been gaining significant steam of late, and last week’s VMworld event put an even brighter spotlight on the space. When considering hyper-converged infrastructure solutions, it’s important to note the distinction between "stack owners" and "stack dependents." Stack dependents are solutions that run in virtual machines and sit on top of another vendor's hypervisor. Stack owners are vendors who run on bare metal and build the entire stack themselves.
The term hybrid is somewhat misleading. In the original sense of the word, it means to bring together two disparate "things" that result in some single new "thing". But technology has adapted the meaning of the word to really mean the bridging of two different technological models. For example, a hybrid cloud isn't really smashing up two cloud environments to form a single, new cloud, rather it's bridging the two technologies in a seamless way so as to make them interoperate and cooperate as if they were a single, unified cloud.
When we are deciding between public or private cloud implementation there are some capabilities we need to take into consideration and security is one of the top ones. Other characteristics like integration with existing systems, costs and management are also important. Looking at the management side of a cloud environment, there may be some delivery models that can be used in this arena that can bring new ways into the decision process.
So exactly how do you kick start a DevOps strategy? For example, say your organization is tied down to a very sequential, but cumbersome Waterfall approach to software development that is wasting precious dollars and hindering productivity? In the following we’ve outlined some strategy tips that every business leader will need to consider as they start down the path of DevOps adoption. Whatever steps your organization takes on the DevOps path of rolling out software faster and more effectively and deployment will require the support of your senior level management team. Explain the advantages of DevOps to the executive team in terms that they can easily understand. Provide an outline of how DevOps and cloud computing can save on ROI and get your new mobile application into the hands of the customer faster and more effectively with higher quality.
When we talk about the impact of BYOD and BYOA and the Internet of Things, we often focus on the impact on data center architectures. That's because there will be an increasing need for authentication, for access control, for security, for application delivery as the number of potential endpoints (clients, devices, things) increases. That means scale in the data center. What we gloss over, what we skip, is that before any of these "things" ever makes a request to access an application it had to execute a DNS query. Every. Single. Thing.
Elasticity is hailed as one of the biggest benefits of cloud and software-defined architectures. It's more efficient than traditional scalability models that only went one direction: up. It's based on the premise that wasting money and resources all the time just to ensure capacity on a seasonal or periodic basis is not only unappealing, but unnecessary in the age of software-defined everything. The problem is that scaling down is much, much harder than scaling up. Oh, not from the perspective of automation and orchestration. That is, as the kids say these days, easy peasy lemon squeezy. APIs have made the ability to add and remove resources simplicity itself. There isn't a load balancing service available today without this capability - at least not one that's worth having.
As enterprises work to rapidly embrace the mobile revolution, both for their workforce and to engage more deeply with their customers, the pressure is on for IT to support the tools needed by their application developers. Mobile application developers are working with a massive variety of technologies and platforms, but one trend that stands out is the rapid adoption of NoSQL database engines and the use of Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) platforms and services to run them. Gartner has predicted that by 2017, 20% of enterprises will have their own internal mobile app store, meaning that enterprises are deploying both commercial and custom applications to their workforce at increasing speeds. There’s no denying the massive growth in mobile applications within the enterprise.
The Internet of Things is only going to make that even more challenging as businesses turn to new business models and services fueled by a converging digital-physical world. Applications, whether focused on licensing, provisioning, managing or storing data for these "things" will increase the already significant burden on IT as a whole. The inability to scale from an operational perspective is really what software-defined architectures are attempting to solve by operationalizing the network to shift the burden of provisioning and management from people to technology.
In my first post, I discussed how software and various tools are dramatically changing the Ops department. This post centers on the automation process. When I was younger, you actually had to build a server from scratch, buy power and connectivity in a data center, and manually plug a machine into the network. After wearing the operations hat for a few years, I have learned many operations tasks are mundane, manual, and often have to be done at two in the morning once something has gone wrong. DevOps is predicated on the idea that all elements of technology infrastructure can be controlled through code and automated. With the rise of the cloud it can all be done in real-time via a web service. Infrastructure automation + virtualization solves the problem of having to be physically present in a data center to provision hardware and make network changes. Also, by automating the mundane tasks you can remove unnecessary personnel. The benefits of using cloud services is costs scale linea...
When Instagram was sold to Facebook in 2012, it employed only 13 people and maintained over 4 billion photos shared by its 80 million registered users. Internally, Instagram was a small business. Externally, it was a web monster. Filling the gap between those two contradictory perspectives is DevOps. Now to be fair, Instagram (like many other web monster properties today) has it easier than most other businesses because it supported only one application. One. That's in stark contrast to large enterprises which are, by most analyst firms, said to manage not one but one hundred and even one thousand applications - at the same time. Our own data indicates an average of 312 applications per customer, many of which are certainly integrated and interacting with one another.
Kirk Byers at SDN Central writes frequently on the topic of DevOps as it relates (and applies) to the network and recently introduced a list of seven DevOps principles that are applicable in an article entitled, "DevOps and the Chaos Monkey. " On this list is the notion of reducing variation. This caught my eye because reducing variation is a key goal of Six Sigma and in fact its entire formula is based on measuring the impact of variation in results. The thought is that by measuring deviation from a desired outcome, you can immediately recognize whether changes to a process improve the consistency of the outcome.Quality is achieved by reducing variation, or so the methodology goes.
I love The Internet of Things. You do, too, even if you don’t know exactly what it is yet. Hardly a day goes by where I don’t find a story about some awesome company creating some new awesome gadget that taps into The Internet of Things. Scrolling through these stories is like taking a peek at the world (and our homes!) three to five years down the line. But, uh, what exactly is The Internet of Things? And why should you care?
Executives charged with building business-driven applications have an extremely challenging task ahead of them. However, the cavalry has arrived with useful tools and strategies built specifically to keep modern applications working efficiently. We partnered with Gigaom Research to carefully grasp, and articulate, how these modern methodologies are improving the lives of IT professionals in today’s software-driven businesses. Typically, this knowledge has been so fragmented it’s been hard to find all this helpful knowledge in one cohesive area. Several blogs and research reports touch on various aspects, but what we learned from our research has been astounding.