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The SDDC Is Here! Now Help Push It Forward!
  Experience IT-as-a-Service at SDDC Expo West. Learn and Contribute in the heart of Silicon Valley Nov 4-6



The Software-Defined Datacenter--the SDDC--sits firmly within the universe of cloud computing. Enterprise IT has become virtualized and re-assembled over the past decade, with software now able to define everything from specific services to entire datacenters.

Among the most dynamic aspects of the cloud computing revolution is the idea of IT-as-a-Service--presented to enterprise IT as an SDDC. Enterprise IT must grapple with legacy technology from the distant past, the recent past, and acquisitions, and eliminate the numerous--and massive--data and application silos that go with it. The SDDC is a breakthrough strategy that enables an integration of legacy with the latest in cloud computing.

The SDDC debate is far from over, so join us at SDDC Expo West Nov 4-6 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in the heart of Silicon Valley to hear the latest developments, strategies, and use cases involving the SDDC.

SDDC Expo West is co-located with Cloud Expo West, and will enable you mingle with your colleagues, contribute to the discussion, and help drive this truly 21st-century feature of enterprise IT forward.

We'll see you in Santa Clara Nov 4-6!


The Top Keynotes, the Best Sessions, a Rock Star Faculty, and the Most Qualified Delegates on ANY SDDC Event!


The software-defined data center provides an agile, reliable and secure foundation for cloud, while also delivering the intelligence and control needed to create sustainable business value.
 
SDDC is a premier conference that connects a wide range of stakeholders to provide a valuable and educational experience for all.




SYS-CON's Cloud Expo drew more than 7,000 attendees at Jacob Javits Center
Benefits of Attending the THREE-Day Technical Program
  LEARN exactly why SDDC is relevant today from an economic, business and technology standpoint.
  HEAR first-hand from industry experts how to govern access to compute, storage, and network resources based on corporate IT policies.
  SEE how to control the data center.
  DISCOVER what the core components of the Software-Defined Data Center are.
  FIND OUT how to transform a traditional data center that is less flexible and costly to a cloud computing environment that is secure, virtualized and automated.
  MASTER the three building blocks of the SDDC – network virtualization, storage virtualization and server virtualization.
  LEARN what works, what doesn't, and what's next.


SDDC Breaking News
When you set off to build an app that will change the world, designing your system architecture to be reliable and scalable is important but the stark reality is that, for your MVP, you probably had a “need for speed” (of development). You didn’t know what all the axes were to scale your application, where your stress points would be, and what weird and wonderful ways your customers would use it down the road. In a world of zero-downtime services, landing the plane to figure it out is not an option. In his session at DevOps Summit, Andrew Miklas, CTO of PagerDuty, will share lessons learned in reliably going from a monolithic application to a microservices architecture: one wing, flap, or aileron at a time.
Enterprise applications are increasing in complexity, with multi-tier and distributed applications being the new standards for dealing with high-volume, high-scale requirements. In many development environments, the ideal scenario is to enable DevOps teams to manage dev/test environments in public clouds, with on-demand, usage based billing model – and to ultimately deploy these complex applications in on-premises clouds. Achieving application portability between heterogeneous cloud environments is critical to achieve the productivity goals of DevOps – yet often requires time-consuming workarounds. This article will present examples of approaches employed today, including newer options for model-driven cloud management platforms with their emphasis on automating application portability and approach to eliminating cloud lock-in.
Compute virtualization has been transformational, yet security policy implementation and enforcement has lagged behind in agility and automation. There are a number of key considerations when implementing policy in private and hybrid clouds. In his session at 15th Cloud Expo, Holland Barry, VP of Technology at Catbird, will discuss the impact of this new paradigm and what organizations can do today to safely move to software-defined network and compute architectures, including: How normal operations and security models cope with compute virtualization and current limitations Which issues can be addressed by deploying security through applications and tying relationships of the apps to hypervisors and the network Holland Barry is the Vice President of Technology at Catbird. He is an expert in networking, security, virtualization and cloud architecture with 20 years of experience in solution architecture and IT roles. He came to Catbird from Dell, where he was a converged infrastruc...
When I took my operating systems fundamentals course in college I was taught that an operating system provides very specific capabilities that provides users with access compute resources for building and running applications. Over time as networking capabilities and bandwidth increased, the notion of a set of modules that interface between the user and the… Read More »
Machine-to-machine (M2M) technology and the resulting Internet of Things are leading us inexorably toward everything-as-a-service (XaaS). As more things get connected, the range of service opportunities expands. And as those services are presented online, they become available for use, re-use and re-purposing. At first thought, the idea of more connected devices suggests simply that there will be more devices around, and as such, more products for manufacturers to make and sell. That’s true, but as I suggested in an earlier blog, even the manufacturers will realize that there is actually more value in services related to those connected things than in the things themselves.
Companies that until recently had never heard of the Internet of things (IoT) are now excited to find that they’ve been IoT players all along. Businesses involved in home automation, security services, vehicle tracking and health monitoring to name a few have been around for a while. They all provide services that involve devices (now known as “things”) that communicate with each other, with their owners, and sometimes with control centers. Increasingly that channel of communication is via the Internet. Therefore, they all see themselves as IoT service providers now, and rightly so. But they are also specialists in the actual services they provide, and the fact that we have an increasingly popular expression to describe the infrastructure they use does not diminish the need for that expertise. While IoT brings additional challenges and opportunities, it doesn’t remove the need to retain business methods and strategies that remain appropriate for the specialist area, even in a rapidly c...
Ixia develops amazing products so its customers can connect the world. Ixia helps its customers provide an always-on user experience through fast, secure delivery of dynamic connected technologies and services. Through actionable insights that accelerate and secure application and service delivery, Ixia's customers benefit from faster time to market, optimized application performance and higher-quality deployments.
As Platform as a Service (PaaS) matures as a category, developers should have the ability to use the programming language of their choice to build applications and have access to a wide array of services. Bluemix is IBM's open cloud development platform that enables users to easily build cloud-based, creative mobile and web applications without having to spend large amounts of time and resources on configuring infrastructure and multiple software licenses. In this track, you will learn about the array of services to support and accelerate application development, as well as building applications on Bluemix using Java and node.JS. Learn more about Bluemix at www.bluemix.net.
Seagate has a strong track record of collaborating with others to develop better cloud solutions. The Seagate Cloud Builder Alliance program, for example, leverages the company’s knowledge of storage and cloud-optimized solutions to give cloud service providers the customized, flexible and scalable server and storage solutions to meet the high levels of service their customers demand. Seagate also is a member of the OpenStack Foundation and Open Compute Project to help define and promote open-source standards for cloud computing.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Cloudian, Inc., the leading provider of hybrid cloud storage solutions, has been named “Bronze Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 15th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 4–6, 2014, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Cloudian is a Foster City, Calif.-based software company specializing in cloud storage. Cloudian HyperStore® is an S3-compatible cloud object storage platform that enables service providers and enterprises to build reliable, affordable and scalable hybrid cloud storage solutions. Cloudian actively partners with leading cloud computing environments including Amazon Web Services, Citrix Cloud Platform, Apache CloudStack, OpenStack and the vast ecosystem of S3 compatible tools and applications. Cloudian's customers include Vodafone, Nextel, NTT, Nifty, and LunaCloud. The company has additional offices in China and Japan.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Gigaom Research has been named "Media Sponsor" of SYS-CON's 15th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 4-6, 2014, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Ashar Baig, Research Director, Cloud, at Gigaom Research, will also lead a Power Panel on the topic "Choosing the Right Cloud Option." Gigaom Research provides timely, in-depth analysis of emerging technologies for individual and corporate subscribers. Gigaom Research's network of 200+ independent analysts provides new content daily that bridges the gap between breaking news and long-range research.
Today, almost every company has a directory that needs to be managed. Spending valuable company time monitoring servers, provisioning and deprovisioning users, auditing, and assessing security concerns takes away from the core competency of the team – building product and delivering to customers quickly. DaaS takes on the burden of those tasks, and allows the team to focus on what they do best. In his session at DevOps Summit, Rajat Bahargava, Co-Founder, Chairman, and President & CEO of JumpCloud, will talk about what DaaS is, how it eases the pain caused by AD and LDAP, and why cloud-based directories are where the industry is heading.
The move in recent years to cloud computing services and architectures has added significant pace to the application development and deployment environment. When enterprise IT can spin up large computing instances in just minutes, developers can also design and deploy in small timeframes that were unimaginable a few years ago. The consequent move toward lean, agile, and fast development leads to the need for the development and operations sides to work very closely together. Thus, DevOps becomes essential for any ambitious enterprise today. This Lunchtime Power Panel at DevOps Summit, moderated by Andi Mann, VP of Strategic Solutions at CA Technologies, goes beyond the basics in a discussion of why DevOps is not only important for transformation, but is mission-critical for enterprises that want to stay in business.
In a world of ever-accelerating business cycles and fast-changing client expectations, the cloud increasingly serves as a growth engine and a path to new business models. Dynamic clouds enable businesses to continuously reinvent themselves, adapting their business processes, their service and software delivery and their operations to achieve speed-to-market and quick response to customer feedback. As the cloud evolves, the industry has multiple competing cloud technologies, offering on-premises and off-premises cloud platforms for both Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS). In parallel, cloud standards are also evolving, including community standards like OpenStack and CloudFoundry. Most organizations who are adopting the Cloud today are ending up adopting it in complex ‘dynamic-hybrid’ environments. There is physical infrastructure that now co-exists along with the new dynamic-hybrid on-premises and off-premises Cloud hosted environments.
Data efficiency – the combination of technologies including data deduplication, compression, zero elimination and thin provisioning – transformed the backup storage appliance market in well under a decade. Why has it taken so long for the same changes to occur in the primary storage appliance market? The answer can be found by looking back at the early evolution of the backup appliance market, and understanding why EMC’s Data Domain continues to hold a commanding lead in that market today. The term “data efficiency” encompasses a variety of different technologies that enable the most effective use of space on a storage device by both reducing wasted space and eliminating redundant information. These technologies include thin provisioning, which is now commonplace in primary storage, as well as less extensively deployed features such as compression and deduplication.
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before October 31, 2014
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[November 9-11, 2015]


SDDC 2014 West Sponsorship Opportunities
Please Call
201.802.3021
events (at) sys-con.com
SYS-CON's SDDC Expo, held each year in California, New York, Prague, Tokyo, and Hong Kong is the world’s leading Cloud event in its 6th year, larger than all other Cloud events put together. For sponsorship, exhibit opportunites and show prospectus, please contact Carmen Gonzalez, carmen (at) sys-con.com.

SDDC 2015 East Sponsorship Opportunities
Please Call
201.802.3021
events (at) sys-con.com
Sponsorship opportunities are now open for SDDC Expo 2015 New York, June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center. For sponsorship, exhibit opportunities and show prospectus, please contact Carmen Gonzalez, carmen (at) sys-con.com.
Cloud Expo New York All-Star Speakers Included...

KAIL
Netflix

GOLDEN
ActiveState

KEMP
Nebula

BEHR
Praxis Flow

LOUNIBOS
SOASTA

CRAWFORD
AVOA

MORGENTHAL
Perficient, Inc.

COCKCROFT
Battery Ventures

HAFF
Red Hat

SHALOM
GigaSpaces

SUSSNA
Ingineering.IT

ROBERTS
BMC

VERNON
VictorOps

WILLIS
Stateless Networks

ROESE
EMC

PADIR
Progress

AMAR
MyPermissions

O'CONNOR
AppZero

BHARGAVA
JumpCloud

DEVINE
IBM

RUSSELL
IBM

MALEKZADEH
Cumulus Networks

McCALLION
Bronze Drum

NEGRIS
Yottamine Analytics

JACKSON
GovCloud Network

KAVIS
Kavis Technology

HARVEY
Chef

KAR
StrongLoop

McFARLANE
LiveOps

IVANOV
Telestax

DUNKLEY
Acision

FABLING
Esri

MATTHIEU
SKYNET.im

HILLIER
CiRBA

JACOBI
Kaazing

FALLOWS
Kaazing

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Testimonials
Great exhibits, great audience, great floor traffic, great conversations with IT leaders and folks in the channel."
TOM LAYDOS
Director, Marketing & Sales Operations at Evolve IP
 
We had a great experience! We look forward to helping the people we met at Cloud Expo build their businesses."
Cari.net TWEET
 
The 2012 Cloud Expo in NY was a great success for the Dell cloud team as we met with many customers, partners, and cloud technologists."
STEPHEN SPECTOR
Senior Product Marketing, Dell Cloud Services
 
Cloud Expo turned out to be an amazing gathering of entrepreneurs."

NISH BURKE
Product Marketing Manager, StorageCraft


Who Should Attend?
Senior Technologists including CIOs, CTOs, VPs of technology, IT directors and managers, network and storage managers, network engineers, enterprise architects, communications and networking specialists, directors of infrastructure Business Executives including CEOs, CMOs, CIOs, presidents, VPs, directors, business development; product and purchasing managers.

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Join Us as a Media Partner - Together We Can Rock the IT World!
SYS-CON Media has a flourishing Media Partner program in which mutually beneficial promotion and benefits are arranged between our own leading Enterprise IT portals and events and those of our partners.

If you would like to participate, please provide us with details of your website/s and event/s or your organization and please include basic audience demographics as well as relevant metrics such as ave. page views per month.

To get involved, email Lissette Mercado at [email protected].

Lastest Blog Posts
When Instagram was sold to Facebook in 2012, it employed only 13 people and maintained over 4 billion photos shared by its 80 million registered users. Internally, Instagram was a small business. Externally, it was a web monster. Filling the gap between those two contradictory perspectives is DevOps. Now to be fair, Instagram (like many other web monster properties today) has it easier than most other businesses because it supported only one application. One. That's in stark contrast to large enterprises which are, by most analyst firms, said to manage not one but one hundred and even one thousand applications - at the same time. Our own data indicates an average of 312 applications per customer, many of which are certainly integrated and interacting with one another.
Now while we kidding around about naming this wall the "MacVittie-Roberts wall of DOOM", we weren't kidding about the need for better performance monitoring in production. After all, to definitely say that application performance is faster requires that we've measured performance after some change. You might notice that various forms of "measure" are bold. I could also italicize them, if it makes it would more clearly emphasize that measuring performance is critical to both improving and maintaining it.
In my first post, I discussed how software and various tools are dramatically changing the Ops department. This post centers on the automation process. When I was younger, you actually had to build a server from scratch, buy power and connectivity in a data center, and manually plug a machine into the network. After wearing the operations hat for a few years, I have learned many operations tasks are mundane, manual, and often have to be done at two in the morning once something has gone wrong. DevOps is predicated on the idea that all elements of technology infrastructure can be controlled through code and automated. With the rise of the cloud it can all be done in real-time via a web service. Infrastructure automation + virtualization solves the problem of having to be physically present in a data center to provision hardware and make network changes. Also, by automating the mundane tasks you can remove unnecessary personnel. The benefits of using cloud services is costs scale linea...
The Internet of Things is only going to make that even more challenging as businesses turn to new business models and services fueled by a converging digital-physical world. Applications, whether focused on licensing, provisioning, managing or storing data for these "things" will increase the already significant burden on IT as a whole. The inability to scale from an operational perspective is really what software-defined architectures are attempting to solve by operationalizing the network to shift the burden of provisioning and management from people to technology.
Certainly, enterprises feel the pressure to transition their networks to next generation architectures like SDN to brace the coming storm that is an app economy. Service providers could provide valuable advice to them on how to do that, if they could yell loud enough over the thunderous roar of millions of devices being activated and apps being downloaded that continues to put pressure on them to scale out their networks. And scale out they must if they are going to continue to keep up with all those apps (they're the ones that deliver a goodly percentage of the traffic from those mobile apps enterprises keep building) and simultaneously increase their revenues.

You have probably realized we are having a Big Data kind of week here at the Plexxi blog. And for good reason. The amount of development and change in this big bucket of applications we conveniently label “Big Data”, is astonishing. Walking around at Hadoopworld in New York last week, I initially felt somewhat lost […]

The post Network Engineers, Pay Attention to Big Data appeared first on Plexxi.

DevOps is a discontinuous innovation in the way organizations develop and deliver software. And as with any new discontinuous innovation, the implication is that creative destruction will follow. Companies that hold on to legacy business and technology models, without pursuing the ever-growing number of digital market opportunities, will wither in the coming decades, supplanted by those companies which have adopted new ways of thinking and operating.

#HTTP #HTTP2.0 Why that version number is so very important ....

It's no surprise that HTTP is the new TCP. Inarguably, more applications are delivered via HTTP than any other. That's including mobile apps, by the way, which are more often than not using HTTP to talk to REST-based APIs on the app side.

But what we don't often say is that HTTP 1.x is the new TCP. That distinction is important (some might say imperative) as HTTP 2.0 moves toward becoming the official, ratified standard.

You see, backwards compatibility is not something that's part and parcel of HTTP 2.0 any more than it was for IPv6. Like its IP cousin, HTTP 2.0 is designed to move the web forward toward a faster, more secure application world.

But in doing so, it made some choices that make it incompatible with previous versions of HTTP.

Now, that means you can't just move to...

#DevOps #SDN And more importantly, what can I do with it? 

So within the realm of software-defined (everything) and DevOps one can find lengthy (and often in depth) discussions on the relevance and indeed importance of programmability to both. In the case of SDN, programmability is specifically subdivided into two areas: control plane and data path.

That's because its core premise relies on - no requires, actually - the decoupling of the two paths.

So you use the control plane to centralize the "state" of the network. What that really means is that some entity external to the data plane (or data path) is responsible for authoritatively managing (and controller) the configuration of the services that reside in the data plane. That happens eith...

The phenomena of Big Data continues to grow as companies of all sizes start to realize the potential ROI that comes from the correct use of massive amounts of data. MIT found that firms who can leverage Big Data can achieve 5-6 percent greater productivity and profitability than their competitors. Knowing the most common mistakes made when handling Big Data will help your organization achieve its goals.
I ran across this quote a while back, and was awestruck at its profundity. I keep it on a list of quotes that I look to for inspiration. To think that the guy who invented the theory of relativity views the world in this way, trying to distill extremely complex ideas down to their simplest form, is a gentle reminder for the rest of us mere mortals that most things in life are not all that complicated. It is we who make things complex. This morning I read a really thought-provoking article on DZone from Dele Sikuade on what he considers to be “the single most important thing in Agile” (see article here). Dele is following Einstein’s advice in trying to distill Agile down to the simplest principle that he argues we all need to try to understand – “you can only give people what they ask for, not what they want.”
Logging as part of the continuous delivery process can help your teams move faster and build a product that your customers really love. Over the last years Continuous Delivery has gained a massive following with many development teams embracing the style. Companies have chosen (as with many other modern developer tools), to either build their own embrace a hosted service likeCodeship. In the end though, no matter if you go with a hosted service or roll it on your own, the goal is to move faster and build a product that your customers really love. For that you need to iterate quickly, get feedback and iterate again.
Throughout the development cycle of new features and functions for any network platform (or probably most other products not targeted at the mass market consumer) this one question will always come up: should we protect the user of our product from doing this? And “this” is always something that would allow the user of the product to really mess things up if not done right. As a product management organization you almost have to take a philosophical stand when it comes to these questions.
So exactly how do you kick start a DevOps strategy? For example, say your organization is tied down to a very sequential, but cumbersome Waterfall approach to software development that is wasting precious dollars and hindering productivity? In the following we’ve outlined some strategy tips that every business leader will need to consider as they start down the path of DevOps adoption. Whatever steps your organization takes on the DevOps path of rolling out software faster and more effectively and deployment will require the support of your senior level management team. Explain the advantages of DevOps to the executive team in terms that they can easily understand. Provide an outline of how DevOps and cloud computing can save on ROI and get your new mobile application into the hands of the customer faster and more effectively with higher quality.
When SDN made its mainstream debut at Interop in 2012, there was quite a bit of excitement tempered by the reality apparent to some folks that technical limitations would impact its applicability above layer 2-3 and, perhaps even at layers 2-3 depending on the network. But even then with all the hubbub over OpenFlow and commoditization of "the network" there were some of us who saw benefits in what SDN was trying to do around network automation. The general theory, of course, was that networks - bound by the tight coupling between control and data planes - were impeding the ability of networks to scale efficiently. Which is absolutely true.