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Cloud Expo
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Achieve IT as a Service with Software-Defined Data Centers (SDDC)
  Join Us at SDDC Expo New York



Software-defined data centers are considered by many to be the next step in the evolution of virtualization and cloud computing as it provides a solution to support both legacy enterprise applications and new cloud computing services

Learn about this architectural approach to IT infrastructure at SDDC Expo – being held June 10-12, 2014 at the Javits Center in New York, NY. At SDDC Expo thought leaders and practitioners, researchers and analysts, vendors and customers will provide a diverse mix of views that will foster new discussions not just within the movement, but also beyond it.

See you in June!
s

The Top Keynotes, the Best Sessions, a Rock Star Faculty, and the Most Qualified Delegates on ANY SDDC Event!


The software-defined data center provides an agile, reliable and secure foundation for cloud, while also delivering the intelligence and control needed to create sustainable business value.
 
SDDC is a premier conference that connects a wide range of stakeholders to provide a valuable and educational experience for all.




SYS-CON's Cloud Expo drew more than 7,000 attendees at Jacob Javits Center
Benefits of Attending the THREE-Day Technical Program
  LEARN exactly why SDDC is relevant today from an economic, business and technology standpoint.
  HEAR first-hand from industry experts how to govern access to compute, storage, and network resources based on corporate IT policies.
  SEE how to control the data center.
  DISCOVER what the core components of the Software-Defined Data Center are.
  FIND OUT how to transform a traditional data center that is less flexible and costly to a cloud computing environment that is secure, virtualized and automated.
  MASTER the three building blocks of the SDDC – network virtualization, storage virtualization and server virtualization.
  LEARN what works, what doesn't, and what's next.


SDDC Breaking News
This report details findings from Forrester Research, Inc. about how the nine most significant solution providers for privileged identity management meet the 18-criteria evaluation and where they stand in relation to each other to help security and risk (S&R) professionals select the right partner for their privileged identity management.
File sync and share. Endpoint protection. Both are massive opportunities for today’s enterprise thanks to their business benefits and widespread user appeal. But one size does not fit all, especially user-adopted consumer technologies. Organizations must apply the right enterprise-ready tool for the job in order to properly manage and protect endpoint data. In his session at 14th Cloud Expo, Michael Bachman, Senior Enterprise Systems Architect at Code42, he will discuss how the synergy of an enterprise platform – where sync/share and endpoint protection converge – delivers incredible value for the business.
Simply defined the SDDC promises that you’ll be able to treat “all” of your IT infrastructure as if it’s completely malleable. That there are no restrictions to how you can use and assign everything from border controls to VM size as long as you stay within the technical capabilities of the devices. The promise is great, but the reality is still a dream for the majority of enterprises. In his session at 14th Cloud Expo, Mark Thiele, EVP, Data Center Tech, at SUPERNAP, will cover where and how a business might benefit from SDDC and also why they should or shouldn’t attempt to adopt today.
Most companies only analyze subsets of their business data and fragmented data in several places – there is nothing “big” about that. By freeing IT time and resources, the process of analyzing your data can be streamlined, ensuring that all the data is in the system, complete, and available. With the operations, implementation, and data management outsourced and IT teams being used as dedicated shepherds of data into and out of the system, executives get the smartest data at their fingertips. Business Intelligence is a huge market. It is more important than ever to understand that projects are still built by small teams of BI specialists. The future – and to a great extent uncharted territory – is generated BI applications. With hundreds of applications, each of them is slightly different. We have already seen this happening in different parts of the IT industry. We have witnessed what has happened to operations, even in small teams, and their ability to command large IT infrastructu...
As recent events have confirmed once again, no single company, organization or government is up to the task of securing the Internet. The never-ending cat and mouse game of exploits chasing vulnerabilities continues. The stunning Heartbleed discovery has shaken the online security establishment to the core. Claims of security and privacy for many Web servers were patently false. We all know a chain is only as strong as its weakest link and the unintended back door information leak that is Heartbleed has undoubtedly allowed countless secrets to escape from secure servers, albeit as random pieces of a puzzle to be reassembled by the hacker. It will undoubtedly go down in history as the most widespread compromise of online services since the advent of the Web. Why? Because we now conduct an unprecedented number of so-called “secure” communications over SSL in every facet of commerce, government and the social web.
Big Switch Networks and Dell on Thursday announced a strategic agreement that will bring state of the art SDN solutions to an increasingly broad audience. Dell will resell the Big Switch Big Tap application, as well as the Switch Light Operating System, running on Dell's high performance Open Networking switches. Big Switch strengthens Dell's open networking initiative, offering customers compelling business case for adopting SDN technologies for needed agility to quickly deploy network services and business applications.
Every company worries about competition. When I ran a large enterprise solutions organization, I took steps every day to ensure we were outpacing the competition. Frequently this involved making “build” vs “buy” decisions for the various product parts or services we needed to drive our business. In each discussion, I would ask my staff: “What is going to help us move faster or be more efficient? What will help us beat our competition?” In today’s business world, IT is a significant driver of competitive advantage and the same considerations of “build” vs “buy” apply to IT, just as they do to other parts of the business. Imagine the following exchange between a Line of Business executive and CIO of a company:
CodeFutures on Wednesday announced that the U.S. Patent Office has granted it a patent for its Continuous Replication technology that helps database administrators perform maintenance and other processing functions without downtime. U.S. Patent 8,626,709, titled Scalable Relational Database Replication, adds to the growing portfolio of database innovations offered by CodeFutures. Its database performance tools, including dbShards for scaling large, high-transaction volume databases, dramatically increases deployed database scalability, performance and reliability.
Need to scale your data tier? The foundation of every application is the database layer, and today application architects have more choices than ever. With these choices come new questions: Which database technology is best for your application? How can your application take advantage of Big Data technology? Can you run your relational database at Big Data scale? What does it take to implement a comprehensive data infrastructure, including your core database, incorporating SQL, No SQL and Big Data platforms? How can you make a scalable database cluster more manageable?
The power of data-driven business networks is increasing, but how do enterprises best leverage that intelligence as they seek new services, products and efficiency? The next BriefingsDirect thought-leader panel discussion focuses on the future of business and how companies can benefit from the new insight and analysis that transparent business networks and processes allow. The power of data-driven business networks and the analytics derived from them are increasing, but how do enterprises best leverage that intelligence as they seek new services, products and efficiency? How do automation and intelligence enter the picture for better matching buyers and sellers?
NaviSite, Inc., a Time Warner Cable Company, announced on Wednesday a key addition to its suite of cloud storage and data replication solutions with the launch of its NaviCloud® Vault: Data Domain® solution. Enabling a secure, reliable, highly available, off-site replication service that leverages EMC® Data Domain deduplication storage systems, the NaviCloud Vault: Data Domain offering delivers a comprehensive, cost-effective, and scalable solution. “Companies are seeking an efficient, cost-effective data protection strategy keeping their evolving disaster recovery and compliance goals in mind,” said Sumeet Sabharwal, Group Vice President and General Manager, NaviSite. “With our NaviCloud Vault Enterprise Replication and Storage solution, we are enabling companies to meet their comprehensive risk, uptime, and business continuity objectives by delivering a robust, scalable, fully managed, and compliant disk-based offsite replication solution.”
Printing and the cloud are seemingly at opposite ends of an organization’s infrastructure spectrum. Printing remains one of the last bastions of an organization’s infrastructure that cannot be completely virtualized since the whole point of printing is to take something virtual and make it physical. The cloud allows businesses to be more efficient and printing should be one of those business processes, maybe even the most basic business process that could be simplified with the cloud. The big benefit of cloud printing is that it drastically simplifies intra-organizational printing structures and flattens the complexities of coordinating hardware across a widely distributed system of computers. Of course, not all cloud printing is created equal, and – as with any new technology – the cloud brings with it a slew of new challenges. Among these are the differences between public and private cloud printing and the ease of implementation to achieve these benefits. Figuring out these differ...
The social media expansion has shown just how people are eager to share their experiences with the rest of the world. Cloud technology is the perfect platform to satisfy this need given its great flexibility and readiness. At Cynny, we aim to revolutionize how people share and organize their digital life through a brand new cloud service, starting from infrastructure to the users’ interface. A revolution that began from inventing and designing our very own infrastructure: we have created the first server network powered solely by ARM CPU. The microservers have “organism-like” features, differentiating them from any of the current technologies. Benefits include low consumption of energy, making Cynny the ecologically friendly alternative for storage as well as cheaper infrastructure, lower running costs, etc.
Get the essentials about agile testing and service virtualization from several different perspectives – get an analyst’s take from Diego Lo Giudice of Forrester Research on how to remove agile testing bottlenecks and ways to calculate your potential return on investment for Service Virtualization. Hear about real customer implementations in the financial services, travel, and healthcare sectors. Learn from experts on how service virtualization is essential for mobile development, testing packaged applications (such as SAP), and more.
Enterprises are moving more and more applications to the cloud. Gartner predicts that the bulk of new IT spending by 2016 will be for cloud computing platforms and applications and that nearly half of large enterprises will have cloud deployments by the end of 2017.1 The far-reaching impact of cloud computing is summarized in a recent McKinsey report on disruptive technologies: “Cloud technology has the potential to improve productivity across $3 trillion in global enterprise IT spending, as well as enabling the creation of new online products and services for billions of consumers and millions of businesses alike.”2 For many organizations, moving applications that can tolerate brief periods of downtime to the cloud is a straightforward decision with clear benefits. However, concerns about how to provide high availability and disaster protection in the cloud may make this decision more difficult for business-critical applications such as SQL, SAP, and Exchange. Understanding the fa...
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SYS-CON's SDDC Expo, held each year in California, New York, Prague, Tokyo, and Hong Kong is the world’s leading Cloud event in its 6th year, larger than all other Cloud events put together. For sponsorship, exhibit opportunites and show prospectus, please contact Carmen Gonzalez, carmen (at) sys-con.com.
All-Star Speakers Include...

KAIL
Netflix

GOLDEN
enStratius

KEMP
Nebula

BEHR
Praxis Flow

LOUNIBOS
SOASTA

CRAWFORD
AVOA

MORGENTHAL
Perficient, Inc.

COCKCROFT
Battery Ventures

HAFF
Red Hat

SHALOM
GigaSpaces

SUSSNA
Ingineering.IT

ROBERTS
BMC

VERNON
VictorOps

WILLIS
Stateless Networks

ROESE
EMC

PADIR
Progress

AMAR
MyPermissions

O'CONNOR
AppZero

BHARGAVA
JumpCloud

DEVINE
IBM

RUSSELL
IBM

MALEKZADEH
Cumulus Networks

McCALLION
Bronze Drum

NEGRIS
Yottamine Analytics

JACKSON
GovCloud Network

KAVIS
Kavis Technology

HARVEY
Chef

KAR
StrongLoop

McFARLANE
LiveOps

IVANOV
Telestax

DUNKLEY
Acision

FABLING
Esri

MATTHIEU
SKYNET.im

HILLIER
CiRBA

JACOBI
Kaazing

FALLOWS
Kaazing

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Testimonials
Great exhibits, great audience, great floor traffic, great conversations with IT leaders and folks in the channel."
TOM LAYDOS
Director, Marketing & Sales Operations at Evolve IP
 
We had a great experience! We look forward to helping the people we met at Cloud Expo build their businesses."
Cari.net TWEET
 
The 2012 Cloud Expo in NY was a great success for the Dell cloud team as we met with many customers, partners, and cloud technologists."
STEPHEN SPECTOR
Senior Product Marketing, Dell Cloud Services
 
Cloud Expo turned out to be an amazing gathering of entrepreneurs."

NISH BURKE
Product Marketing Manager, StorageCraft


Who Should Attend?
Senior Technologists including CIOs, CTOs, VPs of technology, IT directors and managers, network and storage managers, network engineers, enterprise architects, communications and networking specialists, directors of infrastructure Business Executives including CEOs, CMOs, CIOs, presidents, VPs, directors, business development; product and purchasing managers.

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Join Us as a Media Partner - Together We Can Rock the IT World!
SYS-CON Media has a flourishing Media Partner program in which mutually beneficial promotion and benefits are arranged between our own leading Enterprise IT portals and events and those of our partners.

If you would like to participate, please provide us with details of your website/s and event/s or your organization and please include basic audience demographics as well as relevant metrics such as ave. page views per month.

To get involved, email Lissette Mercado at lissette@sys-con.com.

Lastest Blog Posts
From a cost perspective, the networking dialogue is dominated by CapEx. Acquisition costs for new networking gear have historically been tied to hardware, and despite the relatively recent rise of bare metal switching, networking hardware remains a high-stakes business. But SDN is changing this dynamic in potentially significant ways. The first point to clarify when talking about CapEx is that CapEx does not necessarily mean hardware (at least not the way that most people mean). While there is a strict financial definition for CapEx, in the networking industry it has become shorthand for Procurement Costs. Because networking solutions have been predominantly monetized through hardware, we associate procurement costs with hardware, but this is changing.
loud providers Google, AWS and Microsoft are doing some spring-cleaning - out with the old, in with the new - when it comes to pricing services. With the latest cuts, here's a news flash: There's a new business model driving cloud that is every bit as exponential in growth -- with order of magnitude improvements to pricing -- as Moore's Law has been to computing. Let's call it "Bezos' Law," and go straight to the math
Take a moment to consider the things we put up with on a daily basis because they have been understood and accepted as the status quo. Perhaps the old adage, “better the devil you know than the devil you don’t,” rings no truer than for traditional on-premise data storage systems. Sure, there have been numerous improvements in data storage over the years. Sure, the slower, capacity-limited storage systems of yesterday continue to be replaced by bigger, faster storage systems all the time — but has there really been much improvement to address the most common idiosyncrasies that have existed for so long? While data storage systems and cars have very little in common, imagine what automobiles would be like if they suffered from the same constraints and requirements have become the accepted norm with storage systems. Quite simply, owning an automobile would be a vastly different experience. How different? Think about all the things you would need:
Over the past few years, the SaaS community has gained a solid understanding of SaaS financial metrics, as well as many of the operational principles required to achieve them. However, there has always been an obvious gap between what happens on the top line and what happens on the ground. It’s one thing to claim that a 50% reduction in churn will result in a 2X increase in recurring revenue, but it’s quite another thing to make it happen. Achieving that 50% reduction in churn is usually a tedious and unreliable process of trial and error. This is about to change. As the SaaS industry matures, we are witnessing the evolution of SaaS metrics beyond simple, historical financial measures toward sophisticated operational measures in the form of new SaaS customer success metrics and predictive analytics.
We've talked before about the bifurcation of the network, which is driven as much by the evolution of network services from "nice to have" to "critical" as it is by emerging architectures. The demarcation line in the network stack has traditionally been - and remains - between layers 3 and 4 in the OSI model. The reason for this is that there is a transition as you move from layer 3 to layer 4 from stateless networking to stateful networking.
Like moving to IPv6, simply picking up your existing network architecture and moving it to a completely new one is not going to happen overnight. There will undoubtedly still be "traditional" networks hanging around even when SDN adoption is considered mainstream and fully mature. That's the nature of evolution; it doesn't happen in the blink of eye, it takes time. Right now organizations are faced with a variety of options in networking. From VXLAN to NVGRE, from traditional to software-defined, choices abound today. And chances are that most largish networks will actually take advantage of several of those choices, depending on what phase of adoption they're in.
Earlier this week, Ethan Banks wrote a very nice article about Mellanox’s dual spine and leaf network in support of a large amount 10GbE access ports. After describing the scaled up network design, he reviews 8 observations about the design, not to point out good or bad, but merely to point out specific points to consider. Fully coincidental (Ethan lives close to us, but I am pretty sure he cannot peek through our windows) we had gone through a similar exercise this week, documenting the choices and limitations of spine and leaf networks. And as always, the conclusions are not ones of right or wrong, more of awareness of choices and consequences.
Last week was a crazy week for information security. That's probably also the understatement of the year. With the public exposure of Heartbleed, everyone was talking about what to do and how to do it to help customers and the Internet, in general, deal with the ramifications of such a pervasive vulnerability. If you still aren't sure, we have some options available, check them out here: The most significant impact on organizations was related to what amounts to the invalidation of the private keys used to ensure secure communications. Researchers found that not only did exploitation of the vulnerability result in the sharing of passwords or sensitive data, but the keys to the organization's kingdom.
In order to manage today’s highly dynamic application environments, many organisations turn to their logging system for answers – but reliance on these systems may be having an undesired impact on the applications themselves. The vast majority of organisations use some sort of logging system — it could log errors, traces, information messages or debugging information. Applications can write logs to a file, database, Windows event log, or big data store and there are many logging frameworks and practices being used. Logging brings good insights about the application behavior, especially about failures. However, by being part of the application, logging also participates in the execution chain, which can have its disadvantages. While working with customers we often see the negative consequences when logging alone introduced the adverse impact to the application.
One of the most powerful aspects of the Internet of Things is the process of synthesis it achieves; it provides a mental model for people to associate and relate a number of different technologies under one umbrella concept and trend. Therefore one early quick win is a simple taxonomy for listing what these different technology camps are, so here is a first draft approach for this that is now included as the guiding framework in our IoT Technology Roadmap.
OpenStack. OpenDaylight. SDN. Cloud. It's all about abstraction, about APIs and "software-defined" (which really means software-controlled, but this is neither the time or place to get into that debate). It's about jailbreaking the network. Enabling access to features and functionality in a way that results in new services, increased responsiveness and overall, the operationalization of the network.
Not too long ago, it took even the most successful entrepreneurs several centuries or at least decades to reach a valuation of a billion and thus become a member of the exclusive Billionaire Boys Club*. Families like the Rothschilds, the Waltons or the Brenninkmeijers have indeed built up impressive capital wealth, but because it took them several generations, it often became quite diluted among brothers, sons, daughters, nieces, and even third-degree-nephews. With the advent of first: IT; then the Internet and now the cloud, that time frame has rapidly shrunk. Today companies with as little as 50 or even 13 employees reached valuations where reputable companies and world-renowned artists can only dream of. This acceleration is even more poignant when we look at applications in the heart the nexus of Social, Mobile, Cloud and Analytics (SMAC), such as Instagram , Tumbler and recently WhatsApp. And just like in the music industry there is a lot of interest in the tip parade: the list...
Despite claims that there exists (or will, look out!) a mythical "god box" for the enterprise data center, capable of performing every data center function imaginable, it remains, well, mythical. Efforts to effectively secure the data center and the applications it delivers therefore requires a collaborative approach between best-of-breed technologies. But if collaboration across functional IT groups - development, operations, network and security - remains as elusive as nirvana, then collaboration across products has traditionally been seen as likely as sighting the Loch Ness Monster. The arrival of cloud and more recently SDN has changed that, not only encouraging but requiring changes in collaboration capabilities in order to remain considered best-of-breed.
We love analogies. No matter what the topic, analogies are a great way to explain something in a different context to make a specific point with a frame of reference that may be more familiar to those we are making a point to. There is one that seems to come back over and over again in our industry, the one that compares the network to the power grid, network connections to power plugs. I had not heard it for a while but at Interop last week, I heard it used twice in booth demonstrations as part of plug and play pitches. And I really do not like that analogy.
There is probably never going to be a perfect balance in the industry between Do-it-yourself (DIY) and Do-it-for-you (DIFY) networking. It seems exceedingly unlikely that there is a one-size-fits-all type of solution out there. And so we will invariably end up with a bifurcated market that requires multiple solutions for its constituents. But if there is not a perfect balance, which one of these is likely to see the most action? If you were to base your guess on industry chatter, you would have to conclude that DIY has the upper hand. There is a ton of momentum right now with both SDN and bare metal switching. On the SDN front, it is all about orchestration and automation. The ability to streamline customized workflows is attractive, especially for the large IT shops that sink tens of millions of dollars into managing their monstrosities. Once you get into anything that is customized, there is a degree of DIY-ness that is required. No product is designed expressly for your partic...